Tuesday, March 03, 2015

A Blow to the Liberal Arts



Saddened by the news that Sweet Briar College in Virginia will cease operations at the end of the school year.  

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Best of 2014


Website of the Year - Bitter Southerner  

The Pentecostal Serpent by Asher Elbein


YouTube Find of the Year - 
Reg Kehoe & his Marimba Queens




Book of the Year - Do Not Sell at Any Price



Late Night Grub of the Year - Red Arrow Diner 



Gig of the Year  - Christian McBride Trio at Birdland



Best New Thing in Inman Park - Krog Street Market
Via Krog Street Market Facebook Page 
Best Secret Place in Atlanta - Lullwater Power Station
  
Via Atlanta Trails

Couple of the Year - Michael Trent & Cary Ann Hearst



Best Thing from 20 years ago - Freebird at the Fox 



 Best App of 2014 - Blue Note 75 (for iPad)



Atlanta Taste of the Year - Poutine at General Muir


Runner-up - Green Tea Mochi at Ah-Ma's Kitchen

Runner-up - Raw Bar at Kimball House 


Tweet of the Year - John Lurie


Pie of the Year  - Garden and Gun Bourbon Pecan 

A photo posted by Ed Peterson (@ed_peterson) on

Record Label of the Year - Dust-to-Digital





Costume of the Year - Edward Scissor Hands



Top Public Art of 2014 - Mi Casa, Your Casa

A video posted by Ed Peterson (@ed_peterson) on

Time Killer of the Year - The American Values Atlas 




Hokum of the Year - But They Got It Fixed Right On



Enigmatic Pic of the Year - Ethel with Turkey
A photo posted by Ed Peterson (@ed_peterson) on

Friday, December 05, 2014

China's One-Child Policy



Excellent article today from Matthews Asia on the PRC's liberalization of the 1980 One-Child Policy and the general state of population growth in an increasing urbanized China.

"Last November, China’s Communist Party announced that the one-child policy would be relaxed by implementation of a policy in which families are permitted to have two children if either a husband or a wife is an only child. This marks a change from the previous rules which required both the husband and wife to be only children in order to qualify to have a second child.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, ending the one-child policy is unlikely to change the longer-term trend toward a lower fertility rate, as the pressures of modern life lead Chinese couples to have smaller families."